Archives for category: Social Media

Robinson Jeffers quote

I am an amateur at best in the visual realm, so my attempts to marry words and images into pithy graphic memes tend to be somewhat primitive. No wonder I outsource some of my ideas to others, for better treatment. Still, in case you missed the vMemes section of IoaB, above, here are a few — some of them recent, others not:

If you want to see want to catch the latest, click to receive email notifications of new posts on this blog, Discriminations.info — I’ll try to blog each new one, and link to its permanent location at memeVigilante.com.

The first on the list, above, is today’s most recent.

Rooster Advice #1

N.B. Sometimes I use Adobe products to cook these things up; often I just use Apple’s Pages and do a screenshot. The rooster meme, for instance (intended to be first in a series, but who knows?) is a very simple Pages effort, made (as most of these are made) on my iPad Pro. Also, my wirkmanv account on Instagram usually publishes these at release time, too.

 

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A friend of mine on Facebook, definitely not in my camp but a very intelligent person nonetheless (!), asked his friends for assistance:

Question: what are the advantages of characterizing the Trump administration as fascist?

I’m not asking here if this description is true. I’m wondering about its practical uses and benefits.

Many of the answers ignored my friend’s stricture about whether or not the description were true. I tried not to. But I still did not quite follow his guidelines either. For my answer characterized the utility of the word as extremely limited.

My response was as follows:

Using the term, especially when shouting down people who are engaged in peaceable assembly and normal free speech activities, makes you look insane. Against Trump it just seems gratuitous. We have reason to fear tyranny from him (as with his predecessors, if more so), but not all tyrants are fascists.

More importantly, it is worth remembering that, by calling Trump a fascist, you are insinuating that his supporters are fascists (fascism was a popular movement, if not quite populist). And since most of his followers are simply not fascist, their reaction is to dismiss you as an unhinged zealot.

Is that what you want? It certainly exacerbates the gulf between camps. When I argue against Trump with his supporters, I do not go there. But then, I am trying to convince them of something, not make myself feel good.

I’ve used the f-word, too. It makes me feel so righteous!

The full-war verbal arsenal we deploy when we fire the f-word yields quite a thrill. I know. And there are fascists in this world, and they deserve to be called by the name. So, sometimes use the word.

But when we have little evidence of fascism, and use it anyway, it does not really accomplish much but score brownie points with our tribe, while utterly alienating most people not in our tribe.

Those who use the word often, and especially indiscriminately, are not merely engaged in what we now call “virtue signaling.” They are engaged in open cultural warfare with those whom they disagree.

Unless your interlocutor whom you have dubbed “fascist” self-designates as such, you have used a word that he (or she) will likely regard as a fighting word, and you should expect full retaliation, of whatever kind that may take.

And at that point, dialogue enters a quite different realm. People are no longer arguing matters of fact and logic and perspective; no one “follows the argument wherever it leads” in such situations. Political philosophy becomes a distant dream of a forgotten time.

Now, in many situations, were I called a fascist, I would probably laugh in the name-caller’s face. The idea is ridiculous. And my opponent — enemy, really — can only be one of two things: a ridiculous boob, an idiot, a moron; or a liar, a fiend, a very knave.

So, of course, after being called a fascist, one really should be looking for and securing a weapon. For, though when you (dear reader) use the term you are mostly harmless, your opponent may be quite dangerous, and you have a right to defend yourself. Look around for pens, chairs, vases — anything to strike back at the person. Or hold up as shield.

People who throw around mad charges in high moral dudgeon should not be merely brushed off. They present a high probability of grave danger, and should be regarded as potential threats. The fact that the “anti-fascists” of antifa and BAMN are now engaging in open violence on the streets indicates how dangerous such people can be. Prepare yourself for total warfare at the personal level.

And accept the likelihood that a mass, citizen-participating civil war is in the offing, not beyond the horizon, like it used to seem, just a few years ago.

However, if you are a fascist, why should you mind being called one? Well, most people who lob the term around are in warfare mode, so even if the charge sticks, caveats, still.

But why would you be a fascist? Fascism is collectivist corporatism, and corporatism is what we have now. Fascism is just more of what we have now. Why would you want more?

Less, please. Less corporatism; less statism; fewer regulations; an end to group-based law and culture; more competition in politics; and calm down on the war lust, please.

And one way to do the latter might be to stop throwing the f-word about so easily.

twv

The Major Media, Desperate, Will Now Apparently Stoop to Anything in Its Social War Against Outside-the-Beltway Americans

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This could be the most important video you will watch this week:

Why would the Wall Street Journal send three journalists to do a hit piece on a popular YouTube comedian, basically tearing out of context his jokes so that he looks (to gullible Journal readers) like an “anti-semite.”

pewdiepieOn the face of it, doing a “scoop” on “PewDiePie” is an absurd bit of overkill. But Sargon of Akkad (Carl Benjamin) explains how this relates to the great issue of our time: the decline of major-media journalism, the rise of decentralized Internet alternatives, and, with it, the rise of populist politics.

One of the reasons I have not freaked out over the election of Donald Trump has been that I have had some inkling of his social and historical function. To excoriate Trump over and over is to side with the establishment and its social war with the majority of Americans. Mainstream media journalism has become worse than a joke. It has become the broad institutional equivalent of a lying tyrant.

The establishment — consisting of the media, the institutions of “higher learning,” and the permanently employed bureaucracies of the federal and state governments (the latter employed with cushier salaries, benefits and pensions than the average American worker) — has effectively marginalized those parts of the population that it has not bought off (with government subsidies), rewarded directly (by feeding them into the academic-bureaucratic and military-industrial complexes), or duped (with propaganda designed to feed self-righteous tribalism).

Thus it has been that a liar was chosen by the marginalized to play tyrant in the overthrowing of the establishment. It is an historical pattern: you ape your enemy to defeat the enemy. (I do not condone this; I merely note this.) And I, for one, will be glad to see the media establishment finally fall. The extent of their pernicious grip on American institutions can hardly be over-stated. The benefit for us could be enormous. The possibility of a freer future may open up.

Certainly, with the major media as hegemon, no real hope for social transformation can come.

The major media outlets are largely (in America, Fox excepting) insider-progressive. And, to unbuild the corporatist tyrannies that Progressivism and its allied movements (socialism, social democracy, Fabianism, fascism) have placed upon the West, the major media must first be put in their place.

twv

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As I migrate from Facebook and Twitter to Tumblr and, especially, Minds.com, it has been interesting to confront the recent election and its fallout. Twitter and Facebook and YouTube, all a-twitter with debate about the Meaning Of It All, mark a moment in Internet history. How long will this go on? I don’t know. As I listen to the Numb and Number guys wrap up their initial YouTube discussion with the idea that Facebook, Google Plus, and Twitter were all but conspiracies designed to corral bloggers into venues that are easy to censor, to control, I have occasion to rethink. The gentlemen wonder if the alt media will be of lasting influence.

Am I wrong to see the ominous signs of censorship not as conspiracies but as typical examples of capture? These media hubs were designed to network people better than email and blog trackbacks. Internet developers had failed to construct the obvious next step of technical networking advance, full P2P information and sociality interplay. So these hubs proceeded to re-AOLize the Internet. And then the opportunities for control crept in, in part to monetize their operations, in part because their makers are weak-minded ninnies utterly in hock to the race/gender intersectionalists (the SJWs), susceptible to the merest accusation, no matter how idiotic, of Racism or Sexism!

I head off to Minds.com (I’m “wirkman,” of course) because this platform shows more promise of free speech than Facebook, at least. Facebook’s protocols for delivering messages alone are reason enough to abandon the service. Besides, Minds.com, even in beta, features some networking advances that might indeed promote free interplay, which is what most of us want on the Net.

Of course, the n&n guys’ discussion centered around the election. And a number of ideas were thrown up and pinned to a wall. I have slight disagreements with them. So I shall restate, succinctly, my basic take:

  1. Hillary lost mainly because she was a corrupt Clinton, and, beyond that, a horrible, corrupt and unpleasant-to-listen-to, embittered scold.
  2. Not enough Americans are sexist enough to accept the Feminist rationale for Hillary, that her female pudendum alone entitled her to their vote. The Vulva is not enough to trump corruption, thank the Norns.
  3. To argue that had Biden entered the race, he could have easily beat Trump, while probably true, is irrelevant: Trump was selected, in great part, out of a vast upsurge of the collective unconscious, a mass reaction to Hillary herself; had Biden been selected, or merely in play as the presumptive nominee, Trump would not have been selected to oppose him. (For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. See my posts of earlier this year, on just who bred their Nemesis.)
  4. Trump was allowed to rise to the top of the Republican line-up because of at least three mutually reinforcing factors: (a) because the GOP competition was littered with too many too-similar lackluster contestants, and they dropped off one by one because they picked off each other, not Trump — he is the only one who stood out; (b) because the party and its insider operatives had been betraying the membership for decades, accomplishing nothing — indeed, accomplishing the opposite of most promises — leaving an ideological hole at the heart of the coalition, ripe for Trump’s hostile takeover; and (c) Trump could turn on his un-PC charm and get away with it because, finally, the race/gender intersectionalists had screwed the pooch with their protests, censorship, and general unpleasantness, inoculating at least half of America to any censure regarding racism, sexism, and even the grossest breaches of decorum.

How do I know? Call me vatic.

Actually, this is all just my interpretation of American culture today. In my defense: it helps never to have “your guys” win elections. Repeated loss clarifies the mind and scrubs off the crud from one’s corneas. A tragic, or ultimately comic, view of the world settles in. One accepts reality as it is, even knowing that things could go better, were more folks to wise up. 

In my story, the Ice Giants always win.

twv

Today, on Facebook, I posted this:

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